Swirling Medallon

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The first quilt I kitted was Swirling Medallion from Quilting Modern. I very much liked this quilt, and its colours, and I happened to have all the fabric needed! Its not often that I make a quilt exactly as shown in the pattern, but this is what I did.

This project turned out to be much easier than the free piecing. This setting of half square triangles is pretty familiar to many quilters. However the random angles of the grey pieces sets the design apart from the usual. It was a bit worrisome to sew those grey triangles – random can be the most difficult part of any quilting direction. Have you ever made a quilt that has the directions…cut 100 squares and randomly piece them into four patches. Well, how can you help but pick up a square and decide it doesn’t go with the one you have in your hand, so you switch them?

The first quilt I kitted was Swirling Medallion from Quilting Modern.   I very much liked this quilt,  and its colours, and I happened to have all the fabric needed!   Its not often that I make a quilt exactly as shown in the pattern, but this is what I did.

This project turned out to be much easier than the free piecing.  This setting of half square triangles is pretty familiar to many quilters.  However the random angles of the grey pieces sets the design apart from the usual.  It was a bit worrisome to sew those grey triangles – random can be the most difficult part of any quilting direction.  Have you ever made a quilt that has the directions…cut 100 squares and randomly piece them into four patches.  Well, how can you help but pick up a square and decide it doesn’t go with the one you have in your hand, so you switch them?

The only change in method I made was to go ahead and cut the initial squares in half diagonally and then sew each triangle pair.  I’ve never understood why one should take the time to draw a line, sew on each side of that line, then cut in half.  Cutting in half does mean the sewing edge is on the bias, but that’s not scary!

I laid out the pieces on a flannel backed tablecloth on a bed.  I haven’t yet hung up the tablecloth/ design wall in this house which will makes it so much easier to play with and view a layout.

With a bit of re-arranging I was ready to sew the quilt together.

 There was one area where I felt the grey triangles lined up too well, looking like they should match and didn’t. That was re-sewn with a scrap.  I nudged it over just a bit, to stay in the spirit of randomness I wanted it to be as much like the original result as possible 🙂  I had left the white square intact under the grey corner, otherwise I might not have been able to do this little change and instead there would have been much rearranging of the layout.  There were also a couple of triangles that I thought might be eaten up too much with the 1/4″ seaming to come next, but I left those and hoped for the best.

The strangest part of this quilt pattern for me, is the direction to cut multiple background squares which will be sewn together to make up the quilt….as if each background square was its own block.   In all other quilts I’ve made, I would have simply cut large background pieces to make up the size of the quilt.  I went ahead and cut all those background squares, and it does make for an interesting layout!  I”m left wondering why the quilt was designed this way…is it because many modern quilts skip the borders?  And the pieced squares emphasize that look?

When seaming the units together, I pressed the seams open!  This is a huge deal for me 🙂  Many quilters are now pressing seams open, instead of pressed to one side, and I wanted to see how that looked, and how it went went joining rows.  This was not a fun idea, lol.  It was time consuming to press those seams open, and I found that when joining rows, the seams bunched up at some intersections.

 The worst part of seams pressed open is that this happened:  A seam started to open right at the join.  So I had to take it apart, re-sew the first seam (this time I backstitched it!) then join the row.  My stitch length is 2.2, which should be small enough…so I’m not sure what’s happening here, and if its a common pitfall of seams pressed open.  I pressed the row seams to one side!

I have two spots in my home that I would like to fill with a wallhanging.  One is to the entrance to the bathroom which is a narrow hall with the tub on one side and big blank wall on the other – always saying to me, put a wonderful simple quilt here!  I think this quilt is heading for this spot.

 

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